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AutoQuiz: How Do You Compute Electronic Pressure Transmitter Output?

AutoQuiz is edited by Joel Don, ISA's social media community manager.

Today's automation industry quiz question comes from ISA's technical training course, Extreme Instrumentality: Electrical to Instrumentation Cross Training Boot Camp. The training focuses on the knowledge and skill sets required to function as an instrument maintenance technician. Process measurement techniques, measurement and control equipment, calibrations techniques and calibration equipment will be discussed and utilized in numerous hands-on lab sessions. Knowledge gained from this course is designed to train you to be a key asset to an I&E maintenance team.

If a standard electronic pressure transmitter has a range of 50 to 250 psig (345 to 1724 kPa gage), and the pressure is 150 psig (1034 kPa gage), what is the output in mA?

A) 4.0 mA
B) 12.0 mA
C) 13.6 mA
D) 50.0 mA
E) None of the above

Here is the method for converting milliamps to English units:

% span mA = % span eng units

(Reading mA– LRV mA)/(Span mA) = % Span

% Span X (Spaneng ) + LRVeng

Act reading mA – 4 ÷ 16 x spaneng + LRVeng = Readingeng

The correct answer is B.

About the Editor
Joel Don is the community manager for ISA and is an independent content marketing, social media and public relations consultant. Prior to his work in marketing and PR, Joel served as an editor for regional newspapers and national magazines throughout the U.S. He earned a master's degree from the Medill School at Northwestern University with a focus on science, engineering and biomedical marketing communications, and a bachelor of science degree from UC San Diego.

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Joel Don
Joel Don
Joel Don is an independent content marketing, social media and public relations consultant. Prior to his work in marketing and PR, Joel served as an editor for regional newspapers and national magazines throughout the U.S. He earned a master's degree from the Medill School at Northwestern University with a focus on science, engineering and biomedical marketing communications, and a bachelor of science degree from UC San Diego.

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